Follow  AmateurNikon on Facebook  Follow  AmateurNikon on Google+  Follow  AmateurNikon on Pinterest  Susbcribe to RSS/email

Friday, October 13, 2017

5 Things Beginner Photographers Worry about (but Shouldn't)

Note: I am going through a very busy period, with a lot of personal & other obligations. The frequency of articles might suffer a bit for the next couple of months or so, but I expect to be back on a quasi-weekly form by Christmas. Thanks! 

The Internet is a wonderful tool. Just like a real, physical library, it contains a vast amount of information that can solve many problems or answers many queries. But, just like with books, you must learn to filter the information. As the Internet is specifically based on its users, this also means that substandard, erroneous, or simply misleading information can also be propagated.

None of the things listed below can prevent you to take images
such as this.

Today I'll give you a list with the top-5 things beginner photographers worry about (though they shouldn't). These are things we have all considered at some point or another during our journey from learning how to operate a camera to making great images. Some of the following things, to some extent, in some occasions might actually be things to ponder on. But in most cases, they're just distractions that have been blown out of proportions.

In other words, the list of the things below is things that do not hold you back from making great photos.

So, let's begin

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Portrait or Landscape Orientation: Be Aware of Your Habits

Note: I am going through a very busy period, with a lot of personal & other obligations. The frequency of articles might suffer a bit for the next couple of months or so, but I expect to be back on a quasi-weekly form by Christmas. Thanks!

Like so many other articles that have appeared on AmateurNikon, this one too is a result of my own photographic experiences and observations. Learn to do that - paying attention to what works and what doesn't (and why) - and your photography will improve dramatically. I'm here to give you a bit of a helping hand, sharing the things you won't find elsewhere online (because people are too preoccupied with meaningless things, like megapixels and dynamic range) but you must learn to do that too, on your own: pay attention to your photos, and learn to evaluate them (does it work or not) and meta-evaluate them (why it doesn't work).

Portrait orientation for landscapes can be
powerful, but it can also become a habit


So, today's article is about portrait orientation versus landscape orientation. Now, you might initially not see what's the hidden problem here, what could be a cause for disruption. If you paid attention to the title, however, I did mention the word "habit". You see, when asked in a discussion, it's easy to say something like "well, I would use portrait orientation when suitable, and landscape orientation when suitable". The problem is, when you're in the field, your habits might nudge you into overusing one or the other without even noticing. Let's take a closer look

Sunday, September 17, 2017

What to Do when You'Re Bored to Take Pictures

Note: I am going through a very busy period, with a lot of personal & other obligations. The frequency of articles might suffer a bit for the next couple of months or so, but I expect to be back on a quasi-weekly form by Christmas. Thanks! 

I had an interesting online discussion a couple of days ago. Someone was asking for advice from the photographers' community, saying that he wanted to take photos but that he was bored and didn't know what to photograph. I decided to write an article about this because, it seems, this might be a more generalized issue than it might initially appear.

You must feel and experience before you can take photos


To state the obvious: photography is a form of art. You're supposed to create something that conveys your emotions, thoughts, or states of mind (in other words: affect) to other people, that is, your audience. Or, to put a different spin on it, you're supposed to inspire a reaction to your audience - in other words, the affect they "read" might not necessarily be the same you're "writing".